Viewing entries tagged
social responsibility

Young professionals are the future of mining

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Young professionals are the future of mining

Gold Road Resources’ People & Culture Business Partner Samantha Ware urged delegates at Future of Mining Australia to consider the importance of attracting ‘millennials’ to the mining industry and provided strategies to retain the next generation.

Ms Ware used her own experiences as guidance backed by current research.

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Telfer study guides community programs

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Telfer study guides community programs

Working alongside its local community is at the forefront for Newcrest Mining Limited, one of the world’s largest gold mining companies, with a recent economic baseline study undertaken with the Martu people providing direction for their Telfer community programs.

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Job security in gold mining

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Job security in gold mining

Job security can play a defining role in which positions people accept. For family man Abraham van Niekerk, that decision landed him in the gold industry in 2010.

Mr van Niekerk is employed as a senior environmental and social responsibility adviser at Northern Star Resources’ Jundee gold mine near Wiluna.

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Kayshun wins dream night at the "G"

Kayshun wins dream night at the "G"

Gold Industry Group founding member and leading Western Australian gold developer and explorer Gold Road Resources made one footy-mad 12-year old from the remote Cosmo Newberry Aboriginal Community dream come true on the weekend, winning the trip of a lifetime to Melbourne. 

Kayshun Murray won a competition, sponsored by Gold Road and open to all children of Yilka descent, in which they were asked to draw a picture or write a story summarising “what Australian Rules football means to me”. Kayshun’s winning entry was a picture describing football in relation to family, fitness and teamwork.

Member Blog: The quest for conflict-free metals continues

Member Blog: The quest for conflict-free metals continues

Concerned consumers, organisations, and governments around the world continue to shine a light on conflict minerals. These tainted commodities are traded by private armed groups for monetary gain to finance civil conflicts and violence which contribute to the violation of human rights. Thus, the quest for ‘responsible’ and ethically sourced minerals is becoming more and more prevalent.

Conflict minerals, which can include gold ore, are smuggled out of countries such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and parts of Afghanistan, Columbia, and Zimbabwe, and shipped to smelters around the world for refinement.